FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

  • How many years of experience do you have as a therapist?
    • I have more than twenty-five (25) years of clinical experience working with adults, adolescents, and children. My clinical work includes individual, couples, marital and group psychotherapies.

  • How soon can you schedule me from the time I call or email you?
    • My concern is to provide immediate and prompt clinical services. I am committed to scheduling appointments within twenty-four to forty-eight hours.

  • What if at some point I want to include a family member in my session?
    • We would discuss this in your therapy session to decide if it would be helpful to you. I have met with a patient’s spouse, parents, siblings, children, etc. when it is requested of me and seems clinically appropriate.

  • How long are the therapy sessions?
    • This would depend on the format. Individual and family therapy sessions are usually 50 minutes. However, you may want to come twice a week if you are going through a particularly difficult time. Couples and marital therapy sessions are usually 50 minutes. Group therapy is 90 minutes per session.

  • What can I expect of you as my therapist?
    • I believe that every individual has the innate capacity to heal themselves. I view myself as a guide and companion on your journey toward self-healing. I understand that for some people, therapy and concepts such as journey, therapeutic conversations and crossroads may sound strange, and since these terms are not within their cultural or community experiences, patients may feel vulnerable or reluctant to engage in this process. It is my goal to create a compassionate and supportive environment in which you will feel safe to discuss difficult and challenging issues.

  • I understand you utilize a technique called "Guideposts for Success". What are "Guideposts for Success? How are these guideposts used? How is this technique helpful in your practice?
    • Guideposts for Success assists the guide (therapist) and the individual along the journey. For example, we avoid using terms such as "I don't know", and "I will try". Using the guideposts, the individual "seeks to understand" and not merely accept "I don't know" as the answer. Furthermore the focus in our work is on "the doing" and not on "the trying". The guideposts assist the individual to focus on what one wants (empowerment) instead of what one needs (survival). My commitment is to support you during this process and assist you in cultivating your strengths and living to your fullest potential.

  • What are your office hours?
    • I offer daytime, evening and weekend sessions. I will do my best to be flexible to your schedule.

  • Who will know what we talk about?
    • I follow the guidelines of confidentiality of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the American Board of Examiners in Clinical Social Work (ABE) and the American Psychological Association (APA). Nothing about your treatment will be discussed with any professional unless you have signed and dated a release of information form (ROI). There are exceptions whereas if you are in danger of harming yourself or someone, I am legally mandated to break confidentiality. I would discuss this exception with you at the beginning of your therapeutic work.

  • What if I want to take medication?
    • Licensed mental health professionals, including counselors, social workers, psychologists, advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs) and psychiatrists can provide therapy. However, only medical professionals such as advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), psychiatrists and other physicians can prescribe medication. I have access to a network of ARNPs and psychiatrists. Should a medication evaluation be recommended, I would assist you in procuring a medical professional to initiate the medication evaluation.

  • Can you do phone sessions?
    • My preference is for us to meet in person. This is very important for the therapy process. Occasionally, we can check in by phone and you may certainly call if you are ill or out of town, however, our predominant contact needs to be in person.

  • How many sessions will I need to attend? How will I know when it is time to terminate my therapeutic experience?
    • It depends on the issues you are working on and the goals you have set for yourself. Most patients come to therapy once a week and some twice a week. Brief therapy (8-12 sessions) focus on immediate issues and practical solutions; longer term therapy (12 or more sessions) address concerns in more depth and help work with changing patterns of behavior or issues that have developed over a long period of time.

      In regard to terminating your therapeutic experience, we will discuss this together. As you start to feel better and the problems that you came in for seem to be improving may be the time to begin that discussion. I will be honest with you about where I see things at that time.